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‘Mariah Carey Effect’? Demand for Tea Rises in New York City

‘Mariah Carey Effect’? Demand for Tea Rises in New York City


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Coincidentally, this month is national hot tea month

Dreamstime

Tea has been in high demand since Mariah Carey’s New Year’s Eve kerfuffle, which resulted when she was promised tea and did not receive it until after her performance. Paired with the recent cold weather and the way Carey made tea seem like a luxury, the world’s second most consumed beverage is definitely having a moment.

The New York Post reports that hotels such as The Whitby, The Peninsula, The Pierre, The Plaza, and the Taj Hotel have seen a noticeable increase in tea drinking, with higher attendance at their high teas and tea services.

The Tea Council of the USA even confirmed the increase the in tea-drinking to the publication and said that international celebrity Carey’s request for the hot beverage demonstrates that even celebrities love to drink tea. Looking to get into the tea trend but want to do it with style? Check out America’s 8 best hotels for afternoon tea.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Conversations in culture

The In Culture podcast brings listeners behind the scenes with artists, fashion designers, gamers, musicians, and visionaries in their fields to share a real-world look at how they’re shaping culture.

Daniel Humm

“I think as you grow as a craftsman, as an artist, your gestures become stronger. Your conviction becomes stronger. You can actually get to a place where you can make an impact with a very minimal thing,” says Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City. In this episode, the acclaimed chef talks about the intersection of minimalist art and fine dining. We also learn how Humm finds inspiration in Sol LeWitt’s systems and repetition—making the empty plate an opportunity to tell a unique story.

Proenza Schouler

“We had to find what's that essential detail that really defines that garment as what it is and keep that, and all the other elements we were able to kind of strip away,” Jack McCollough says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s approach to minimalism. Here, the designer and his partner Lazaro Hernandez (of fashion brand Proenza Schouler) discuss how they distill each garment down to its essence—and discard the rest.

Julianna Barwick

“So many things can influence how the songs will just shift a little bit in each place, and I found that really interesting when I read that about his philosophy behind his wall drawings,” Julianna Barwick says of the influence of Sol LeWitt’s artistic process. In this episode, the composer and performer shares how she creates a choir of one—“loop by loop by loop, and shape by shape by shape.” We also take a closer look at the relationship between conceptual art and experimental music.

Charles Gaines

“A lot of people think that I was influenced to do conceptual art by looking at conceptual art, and that really wasn't the case. It was really a search for a certain sort of understanding of the self,” Charles Gaines says of his creative process. Here, the pioneering visual artist talks about his radical approach to using systems and formulas as a critical language. We also learn how Gaines builds on Sol LeWitt’s foundations to tackle social constructs like racism and segregation.

Dessane Lopez Cassell is a curator, writer, and editor based in New York. She first became interested in Sol LeWitt as an intern at Mass MoCA, where she led tours on his work. Cassell has since held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and organized projects for MoMA Film, Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Flaherty NYC. These days, she’s the reviews editor at Hyperallergic and sits on the programming committee for BlackStar Film Festival.

Steve Gleason

“ALS is a disease that quarantines and isolates in its very nature. So in a way, for the past nine years, our family has been experiencing something similar to what the world is experiencing right now.”

Former NFL athlete Steve Gleason lives with ALS. But he hasn’t let his diagnosis stop him from fighting for policy changes and new innovations that transform lives by making crucial technology accessible to those living with the neurodegenerative disease. In this episode, he delves into the purpose and strength he’s found in fatherhood and shares insights about Team Gleason, his organization that’s turning disabilities into super abilities by developing innovative technological solutions.

Casey Harris

“We're all individuals, but we are better and stronger when we are a community. When people care about each other more and pay attention to what life is like for other people, that's a really big takeaway.”

Casey Harris, keyboardist for the rock band X Ambassadors, hasn’t let living with low vision hold him back. He has strived to create a world without limits and has found that community and inclusion are more important than ever—especially during times of social isolation. Hear from the infectiously positive musician on ways we can uplift each other and create a future that’s more connected and inclusive than ever before.

Kendall and Delaney Foster

“When you hear that someone has autism, you can't go in with specific stereotypes, you need to just start engaging with them one-on-one, learning about them, learning what their challenges are, what they enjoy doing, how they prefer to interact with someone. It's a very individualized disorder.”

Meet Kendall and Delaney Foster. They’re the sisters behind Unified Robotics, an inclusive after-school program for students with cognitive disabilities. Delaney started the program in 2015 to create a shared activity between her and her sister Kendall, who has autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, find out how the Foster sisters are raising disability awareness. They prove that when programs and technology include people with disabilities, everyone wins.


Watch the video: Η Περιφερειάρχης Αττικής στη διεθνή Έκθεση Vinexpo 2018 στη Νέα Υόρκη (May 2022).


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