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Potato pierogi served in a nut artichoke bath recipe

Potato pierogi served in a nut artichoke bath recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Vegetable
  • Root vegetables
  • Potato

There seems like a large ingredients list but the recipe is surprisingly easy to make and fairly quick. It's so delicious it's worth the effort I promise! Recipe inspired by The Daring Kitchen, Anula's Kitchen and Paul Gaylers 'Virtually Vegetarian'.

1 person made this

IngredientsMakes: 30 small pierogi

  • 75g very finely chopped almonds
  • 200ml milk
  • 375g plain flour
  • 1 large egg
  • 5ml salt
  • 250ml lukewarm water (approx)
  • 400g waxy potatoes
  • 1 knob butter
  • 1 handful grated Parmesan cheese
  • 50ml hot milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon very finely chopped almonds
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 jar whole marinated artichokes, drained

MethodPrep:1hr ›Cook:20hr ›Extra time:1day marinating › Ready in:1day21hr

  1. Soak the almonds in 200ml milk overnight.
  2. Place 250g of the flour in a large bowl or on a work surface and make a well in the centre. Break the egg into it, add the salt and a little lukewarm at a time (in my situation 125ml was enough). Bring the dough together, kneading well and adding more flour or water as necessary. Cover the dough with a bowl or towel. You‟re aiming for soft dough. Let it rest 20 minutes.
  3. Boil the potatoes in salted water until tender, drain well then mash with the butter, Parmesan, hot milk, salt, 1 tablespoon almonds and egg white. Set aside.
  4. Strain the almonds from the milk then bring it and the artichokes to the boil. Then either push the artichokes through a fine sieve back into the boiled milk or use an electric mixer to pulp the milk and artichokes together. Set aside to be heated later.
  5. On a floured work surface, roll the dough out thinly (1/8” or about 3mm) cut with a 2-inch (5 cm) round or glass. Spoon a portion (teaspoon will be the best) of the filling into the middle of each circle. Fold dough in half and pinch edges together (with fingers or use the back of a fork). Gather scraps, re-roll and fill. Repeat with remaining dough.
  6. Bring a large, shallow saucepan of salted water to the boil. Drop in the pierogi, not too many, only single layer in the pan! Return to the boil and reduce heat. When the pierogi rise to the surface, continue to simmer a few minutes more (usually about 5 minutes). At this stage reheat the sauce, careful not to let it boil. Remove one dumpling with a slotted spoon and taste if ready. When satisfied, remove remaining pierogi from the water.
  7. Serve immediately: swim the pierogi in sauce and serve with a sprinkle of grated Parmesan.

Tips

Cold pierogi can be fried. Uncooked pierogi can be easily frozen and boiled taken out straight from the freezer.

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This week is dedicated to recipes using ingredients found at a local farmer’s market. This can include, meats, fruits, vegetables, honey, syrups, jams, nuts, herbs, spices, etc.

Thanks Ellen from Family Around the Table and Christie from A Kitchen Hoor’s Adventures for hosting our Farmer’s Market Event!

Farm stands and farmer’s markets are a big part of summer in my area. You get fresh picked salad lettuce, corn on the cob, berries, cukes, peaches, cherries, all so good.

People set up roadside stands to sell extra zucchini, tomatoes and peppers. These are usually simple tables with a box with a slit in the top. The honor system applies here. Some backyard farmers price their wares. Three zucchini for a dollar. A watermelon for $2.50.

Other stands ask for donations. Late in the season, you start to see free signs here and there. Better eaten than wasted.

Sometimes I get a good deal on potatoes and onions. Those two are the base for good pierogies.
I’m a big fan of pierogies. I love these little “dough pockets” stuffed with potatoes and American cheese, or sauerkraut and onions. I even make them with Certified Angus Beef® brand beef and peppers.

But this post is about farm markets and stands. Back to the veggies. I’m thinking I’ll stick with the basic potato, onion and cheese. Spinach is plentiful right now, so in it goes.

Since spinach and ricotta are a perfect pair, bye, bye American cheese.

Of course these pierogies need homemade dough. A simple flour, egg, salt and water works perfectly.

I recommend you rest the dough for about 10 minutes before you roll it out.

I use a 3-inch rock glass to cut the circles. You can use a doughnut cutter, cookie cutter or inverted measuring cup. Whatever works for you.

A rounded teaspoon of filling is all you need. Too much filling leaks out.


Recipe: Spinach-Artichoke Pierogy Casserole

Alright, we need you to grab your planner or open your calendar app, skip ahead to October 8, and then block off the entire day so you can celebrate properly. That might look like any other Tuesday, but it’s actually National Pierogy Day, which commemorates the day that Ted Twardzik, Sr., the founder of Mrs. T’s Pierogies — the largest producer of frozen pierogies in the country — sold his first batch of pierogies to the local grocer in Shenandoah, PA. (But you don’t have to write all of that on the calendar.)

Of course, no one is suggesting that you wait until October to acknowledge your love for All Things Pierogy. In fact, we’re kicking off the festivities now, with an easy weeknight recipe from Kelli Foster, one of our food editors here at Kitchn.

Kelli has combined the savory goodness of Mrs. T’s Classic Onion Pierogies with the irresistible flavor of a classic spinach and artichoke dip. The result is a bold and creamy casserole bake that’s sure to become one of your favorite go-to, middle-of-the-week (or even weekend!) meals that you can share with family and friends. In fact, it’s perfect for those neighborhood get-togethers when you don’t have a ton of time to prep ahead and feel obligated to bring more than a bag of chips.

If you’re not already on a first name — er last initial — basis with Mrs. T’s Pierogies, then you’re in for a treat. They’re currently available in 14 flavors — including Classic Cheddar, Loaded Baked Potato, and Classic Onion, which is used in this casserole. Each pasta pocket is stuffed with the stuff you love, like creamy mashed potatoes and cheesy goodness. (In addition to being just as delicious as the full-sized varieties, Mrs. T’s Mini Pierogies are also flat-out adorable.)


Potato pierogi served in a nut artichoke bath recipe - Recipes

FILLING: SAUERKRAUT: Place sauerkraut in pan, cover with water and bring to boil. Simmer for 5 minutes, drain, rinse and squeeze out all water. Place sauerkraut, onion and bacon or salt pork in a frying pan. Fry until browned adding a little oil if bacon is lean. Put aside to cool.

POTATO & FARMERS CHEESE: Prepare potatoes as for mashed potatoes. In separate pan while potatoes cook saute onion with butter until tender. To prepared potatoes stir in onion mixture and farmers cheese. Blend well.

Roll dough 1/2 at a time on floured board. Cut into circles with a glass or doughnut cutter. Roll each circle again maintaining circle shape to approximately 1/2 its size again. Place filling in each circle so full when folded in half but not overflowing. Travel around edge on both sides with a fork to crimp and seal. Drop into simmering water until each pierogi floats. Spread out to cool or drop into cold water. Place in refrigerator or container in freezer until ready to serve.


Potato pierogi served in a nut artichoke bath recipe - Recipes

Want to see what other Summer Vegetable recipes were made during the swap? Here is the link to the Summer Vegetable Recipe Swap Roundup

This week's recipe swap theme was Summer Vegetables. I lucked out and got Big Grandma's Stuffed Artichokes from my friend Melissa. I love artichokes and was excited to try this recipe.


I only made one artichoke because, as you know, SP isn't a fan. I also left out the raisins because I don't like them. I really wanted to love this recipe but it was a little dry. I'm used to dipping artichoke leaves in butter, so maybe that's why. I've looked at other stuffed artichoke recipes online that call for ricotta cheese or egg in the filling and I think that would help a lot.

Big Grandma's Stuffed Artichokes
I Was Born to Cook

4 large artichokes
2 cups bread crumbs
1 cup grated Parmesan or pecorino romano cheese
1 cup raisins (red or white)
1/2 cup pine nuts
Olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Using a sharp knife, cut the top of the choke to level it. Cut stem off. Peel stem and reserve to put in pot when cooking artichoke. With kitchen scissors, cut the sharp edges off the leaves.

Mix Parmesan cheese, raisins, pine nuts and bread crumbs with some pepper. Spread the leaves on the chokes and stuff with mix. One way to do this: stand the choke in a separate soup bowl and hollow out the center where the thorny leaves are. Put a very generous amount of the mixture on the center cavity, spread the leaves and push the mixture into the leaf area.

Using a pot tall enough to cover the chokes, place the chokes in, fill with water and some olive oil to cover the bottom of the leaves (about a third of the way up the artichoke). Drizzle some additional oil on top of each choke.

Bring water to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Cover the pot and steam the chokes for approximately one hour. Pull a leaf and taste for tenderness. If you like it more tender, steam longer. Serve immediately.


Potato vareniki

[Welcome to the Sous-Chef Series, a new, sporadic feature on SK in which I invite cooks I admire over to my small kitchen to teach me — and thus, us — to make one of their specialties. Spoiler: I’m the sous!]

I first heard of the Russian restaurant Kachka when I was last in Portland, Oregon on book tour (hi, Powell’s!), when no fewer than a dozen people separately told me I had to go while I was there. A few said it wasn’t just their favorite restaurant in Portland, but their favorite restaurant, period. This made me all the more sad that I didn’t have time to make it happen. My regrets snowballed when I finally dug into the restaurant’s eponymous cookbook last summer. I was no further than the first page — where the confusion as to what is “Russian” food when “food from the former Soviet Union including Russia but also the countries surrounding it like Belarus, Latvia, Ukraine…” would be more accurate is humorously laid out — when I became deeply, emphatically obsessed with all that I’d missed.


The book is a delight on every page a bit of history, a substantial amount of wry observations, some hilarious guides (how to navigate a Russian grocery store, the rules of the “drunk fest” known as a pyanka, how to “tetris” your zakuski spread, and I will never stop laughing about the day in the life of sauerkraut, kickbacks and all, in the former Soviet Union) and recipes that will make you want to take the vodka bottle from your freezer (or start keeping it there, have I not taught you anything), have a rowdy group of friends over, and cook, eat, and drink until you make plans for next time. I immediately bought another copy for my mother-in-law and a third for a friend. I could go on and on, but then we’d never get to the wild thing that happened last month.

A couple months ago, I received an email from the restaurant’s publicist that Kachka chef Bonnie Frumkin Morales would be in New York to cook a seder at the James Beard House (nbd!) and did I want to get coffee with her? No, I said. I have a better idea. Does she want to come over and cook with me in my small, terrible kitchen, specifically potato vareniki (Polish pierogi’s Ukrainian cousin)? I want to learn how to make them from a pro. Astoundingly, she said yes.

So, let’s talk dumplings. Even if you’re not self-described dumpling fanatic, even if your love language isn’t swaddled bundles of boiled or fried carbs, I’ve never met anyone who didn’t like pelmeni and vareniki — only people that have been unlucky not to have tried them yet. They use the same dough, but pelmeni are generally filled with meat (I have a recipe for Siberian Pelmeni in Smitten Kitchen Every Day) vareniki with vegetables, fruit, or cheese. Vareniki are often a little larger, but I prefer the one-bite-perfection of pelmeni, and make them the same size. Most Russians I know (and the one I’m married to) keep bags of each in their freezer for quick meals, and while they’re often quite good, nothing compares to making them at home. Manufactured dumplings require a dough stiff enough for machines and to hold up to shipping. Homemade doughs are much more tender and delicate. I see you running away, but wait! The dough is mixed and kneaded by hand and requires only a rolling-pin to stretch out — no pasta machines, no machines at all. It’s wildly forgiving. I did a downright sloppy job of sealing mine this week and not one of them tore or leaked.

Back to the visit: After I forced my homemade chocolate croissant attempts (a recipe coming soon, I hope) and storebought coffee on Bonnie and her husband/business partner/road prep cook, Israel Morales, she showed me how to use the pelmenitsa I’d just purchased inexpensively online. Bonnie is a pelmenitsa enthusiast. She considers the mold “a perfection of Soviet design, all angles and efficiency striving towards a utopian future of dumplings for all.” It’s economical (no wasted dough), the 3-cm width is “the perfect bite”, the circular opening in the center of each is “the ideal void” to pack in more filling, and the speed — instead of folding one at a time by hand, you make 37 at a time — is pretty key when your restaurant makes as many as theirs does each day.

Still, a pelmeni mold is not a prerequisite for making Russian dumplings. You could use a potsticker mold, or you can form them by hand, either by folding them into half moons and crimping the edges, or in tortellini-like shapes. I’ll walk you through each. I hope you’ll make them. Even if you think you’re not a dumpling person or that this isn’t carbs-wrapped-in-carbs weather, these will shake every idea you have of dumplings to its core. They’re slippery and light where you’d expect heaviness uplifting instead of nap-inducing. And the next time you reach for the same old freezer meal and find these instead, you’ll know you’ve won the lottery.

A pathetic sidebar: Because I’m bad at, well, calendars, I hadn’t realized until much later than I should have that Vareniki Day was also Seder Day, the first night of Passover, when I had 17 people coming over for dinner. Maybe you’re thinking, “Cool! You can feed everybody vareniki made by a fancy chef!” I briefly thought this too, then I remembered basically the only rule of Passover — ha! Anyway, it was a wild and fun day but I’m going to schedule my visiting chefs and multi-course dinner party days separately next time, just the same.

Previously

Potato Vareniki

  • Servings: Makes about 110 dumplings by hand or 111 to 148 in a pelmenitsa a serving is 20 bite-sized dumplings
  • Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • Source: Chef Bonnie Morales of Kachka and Kachinka Restaurants
Simple potato filling
Luxurious potato filling
Dumpling dough
To serve

For the luxurious potato filling: Place potatoes in medium saucepan and add as much milk as you need to cover the potatoes. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are cooked through, about 15 minutes. Strain off milk, saving 2 tablespoons, discarding the rest. Place cooked potatoes and reserved milk back in pot, add salt and butter, and use a potato masher to gently bring the ingredients together. Transfer potato mixture to a sieve and use a spoon or bowl scraper to push it through. Once potatoes are passed, let mixture cool to room temperature. Use a spatula to gently fold in egg until just combined. Add semolina and mix until uniform, trying not to overwork the mixture. Add dill, if using. Place in refrigerator until fully cooled before using.

Make the dumpling dough: Combine flour and salt in a large bowl with a fork. Add half the water and the egg and use the fork to mix them into the dough. Drizzle in all but last 1 tablespoon of remaining water, mixing as you pour until dough forms shaggy clumps. Use your hands to bring the dough together inside the bowl, using the last tablespoon of water if needed. Knead it several times in the bowl before transferring it to your counter. Knead dough for 10 to 12 minutes (set a timer don’t skimp!) until it forms a smooth, elastic dough. Return to empty bowl and cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap. Let rest at room temperature for 1 hour, which relaxes the dough and makes it easy to roll thin.

You can also make the dough in a stand mixer, using the dough hook to knead for 5 to 7 minutes.

Form vareniki, both methods: Grab a spray bottle of water (or a dish of water and a pastry brush, although just your finger is sufficient for hand-formed dumplings), a rolling pin, and liberally dust a rimmed baking sheet with flour. Remove one-quarter of dough (for hand-formed dumplings) or one-sixth of dough (for pelmenitsa dumplings) from bowl, keeping the rest wrapped until needed. On a very well-floured counter (Bonnie explains that the dough will only absorb as much flour as it needs and no more, so you cannot use too much) and roll it out on a lightly floured countertop until it’s thin enough that you can see light through it if you hold it up you should be able to roll it to the thinness of pasta dough.

Form vareniki by hand: Cut out rounds of dough with a 2-inch round cutter or a drinking glass. Using two spoons, a small scoop, or a pastry bag, fill each round of dough with a blob of filling — about 1 teaspoon. Dab, brush, or mist the edges of the dough with water, then fold the round into a half-circle, pressing the edges to seal. Take the edges and pull them towards each other, pinching the corners to seal in a tortellini shape. As you shape a few dumplings, you’ll get a sense of how much filling you can stuff into each dumpling and still stretch the dough around it to seal. Transfer the shaped dumplings to your prepared baking sheet. Gather the scraps together back into the ball. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling, rerolling the scraps after they’ve rested enough that you can roll them out again. (If they resist rolling, wait 5 minutes, try again, repeating this until the scraps roll as thinly as the first round did.) I like to slide my tray of vareniki into the freezer while working on the next batch they’re easier to move around once semi-frozen. At this point, you can cook them right away — semi-frozen or fresh — or freeze them for future use. (Freeze the rest of the way on the baking sheet so they don’t stick, then transfer to sealed bag).

Form vareniki with a pelmenitsa: Drape the rolled-out dough over your pelmenitsa, so that it reaches over the ends of the mold. Press or pat the dough lightly so that an imprint of the mold below is made on the dough this is so you know where to center the filling. With two spoons, or a pastry bag fitted with a wide tip, scoop or pipe a little blob of filling into each of the 37 divots. You’ll need just a heaping teaspoon or so in order to still be able to seal things (don’t get carried away with the amount of filling!). When you have piped filling into all the slots, roll out a second piece of dough until it’s slightly larger than your mold. Lightly spray some water over the top of your filled vareniki, or lightly brush the exposed dough with water if you don’t have a spray bottle, and then gently place the second round of dough over the top. Firmly roll over the top with your trolling pin, several times as needed, to seal the vareniki and cut the dough between them. Remove the outer trimmings that are not part of the dumplings themselves. (Depending on how thin I’ve gotten the dough, I can reuse these to make a 4th pelemenista of dumplings, hence the range in yield. Let the dough rest until it rolls easily again.) Turn the pelmenitsa upside-down over the prepared baking sheet and nudge the filled dumplings out. Don’t worry if they don’t separate right away. Slide the tray into the freezer while you repeat with the remaining dough and filling. (Once they are firm, you can easily break them apart.) You can cook them right away — semi-frozen or fresh — or freeze them for future use. (Freeze the rest of the way on the baking sheet so they don’t stick, then transfer to sealed bag).

Cook your vareniki: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the dumplings, about 20 per person (or 12 to 15 if they’re larger). Adjust the heat as needed to maintain a healthy-but-not-too-vigorous boil. Add the dumplings and give it a few good stirs, making sure none stick to the bottom of the pot. Cook until the dumplings rise to the surface, and then 1 minute more (this will take 4 to 5 minutes). If you’re not sure if they’re done, you can always remove one and cut it in half — it should be hot in the center.

Finish and serve: While the dumplings cook, prepare a mixing bowl to dress your dumplings. Everyone likes their vareniki a little differently but I’ve been forever converted to Bonnie’s method. For each serving, you want to place a good pat (about 2 teaspoons to 1 tablespoons) of butter and 1 to 2 teaspoons of plain vinegar in the bottom of your bowl. Add salt and pepper, if you wish. When the vareniki are done, use a large slotted spoon (this is my favorite) to transfer the dumplings, shaking off the extra water, right into the bowl. Toss! The butter will melt and come together with the vinegar from the heat of the dumplings. Keep stirring, whirling everything together until the vareniki look glossy and lightly sauced and you are astounded by your newfound cheffy skills. Transfer to individual bowls and let everyone add the finishes they wish.

Do ahead: The simple potato filling is good in fridge for 4 to 5 days, the luxurious one for 2 days.


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The deep flavors in our beef stew come from browning the chuck roast in batches and cooking the onions and garlic until they're sweet. Cooking low-and-slow in the oven allows the meat to become completely tender in its rich red wine-laced sauce. This is a great dish to make ahead as its complex flavors intensify overnight.

The Best Crepes

Our classic crepe is versatile enough to go sweet or savory, just omit the vanilla if going the savory route. The rest time here is key the flour absorbs the milk as it sits giving you a more tender crepe and golden color.

The Best Cinnamon Rolls

Once you've tried "from-scratch" cinnamon rolls, you'll never go back! The secret to our rolls is the wet, buttery dough and double rising time. Once baked, they will be light and pillowy and full of buttery cinnamon goodness on the inside.

The Best Pumpkin Pie

Instead of store-bought pumpkin pie spice, we like using ground cinnamon and nutmeg so we can control of the ratio between the two, opting for a healthy amount of nutmeg as it brings out the flavors in the pumpkin.

The Best Coconut Cream Pie

This old-fashioned pie is filled with rich, creamy custard, then capped with a cloud of toasted meringue and a generous sprinkling of sweet coconut flakes. It tastes as if you pulled it straight from the dessert case of your favorite diner, only better.

The Best Focaccia

It's easy to make classic focaccia at home. Our version is airy and slightly chewy, with a delicate golden crust. A drizzle of salt water over the dough during the final rise gives the bread a deeper flavor.

The Best Carbonara

Now this is our idea of comfort food. Creamy and rich, it's the quintessential dish for a chilly evening. We like to splurge every once in a while and add a knob of butter to the cheesy egg sauce just to round it out. We've left that option up to you, however. Either way, we can't think of a more classic or satisfying pasta dish.

The Best M&M Cookies

We took our favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe and increased the brown sugar to make these cookies extra moist and chewy. Then we super-sized them &mdash the better to get in more of our favorite candy-coated chocolates. Save some extra candy for topping each cookie before baking. The result, cookies that look just as good as they taste!

The Best Meatloaf

We opted for an all-beef meatloaf rather than the traditional mix of beef, veal and pork because we wanted that satisfying big beef flavor. Milk adds richness and tenderizes the meat, preventing it from getting tough or dry. We also cook the onion instead of adding it raw as many recipes suggest, which imparts a welcome sweetness and eliminates that harsh raw onion flavor.

The Best American Potato Salad

Our favorite potato salad kicks up the traditional mayonnaise base with not only chopped dill pickles, but also uses the pickle brine for extra tang. Scallions, celery and parsley add freshness and a little crunch, while hard-boiled eggs practically make it a meal.

The Best Apple Pie

We love using a variety of apples in our pie it adds both flavor and texture and makes every bite a little different. Vodka in the pie crust makes the dough easier to work with, and since the alcohol burns off during baking, it doesn't impart any flavor. But feel free to use bourbon or apple brandy instead to complement the filling.

The Best Sweet Potato Casserole

We opted for a nutty crumb topping over marshmallows to create a pleasantly crunchy contrast to the creamy and soft mashed sweet potatoes. The filling gets a pumpkin pie-like treatment, with brown sugar and vanilla for a deep caramel flavor and butter and eggs for richness. This recipe is bound to become a holiday staple.

The Best Gravy

Our gravy delivers rich flavors from a homemade stock made with the turkey giblets, onion and fresh herbs. Roast turkey drippings and a dash of Worcestershire sauce round out this creamy, lump-free holiday must-have.

The Best Peanut Brittle

This sweet and salty peanut brittle has the perfect crunch and sheen. With a little patience, you'll have a delicious brittle to serve to party guests or as an edible gift around the holidays.

The Best Broccoli-Cheddar Soup

This outstanding broccoli-cheddar soup is rich, cheesy and packed with flavor. We decided to puree just over half the soup which makes it extra thick and creamy, and left the remainder chunky so there are broccoli bits in every bite. Gild the lily with more shredded cheese on top to satisfy your comfort food craving.

The Best Bacon Cheeseburger

While we love a grilled burger, this one is our go-to for all seasons. Instead of making a typical patty, we smash the meat in a super-hot cast-iron pan to get crispy, ruffled edges. Once you smash your burgers this way, you'll never go back! We top them with all the fixings, including our perfectly balanced special sauce. It's what we consider an iconic burger.

The Best Butter Cookies

Your search is over &mdash this perfect butter cookie will stay in your recipe box for years. It's crisp, yet tender and perfect for tea for two or cookies for someone special. Plus, you have the choice to make drop cookies or a slice-and-bake version!

The Best Vanilla Cake

We love the light texture that cake flour gives baked goods, but we didn't want you to buy a whole box of it. So we used a cheat &mdash all-purpose flour mixed with cornstarch. Cornstarch blocks the formation of gluten in the flour and makes the cake airy and tender. We also added 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil, an old baker's trick, to ensure that the cake stays moist. The heavy cream keeps the frosting light and fluffy.

The Best Crab Cakes

When we set out to make the "best" crab cakes, opinions in the test kitchen were strong and varied. But we could all agree on plenty of fresh, high-quality crabmeat with very little filler. After some tinkering, we created these decadent cakes&mdashgenerously sized and highly seasoned&mdashwith plenty of lemon juice, fresh herbs and spices. The jumbo lump crabmeat is front and center, so splurge on the best and freshest you can find.

The Best Samosas

As much as we love the filling in these samosas, we also must give a big shout-out to the dough. We tried a number of techniques to get that perfect light and crispy texture &mdash the hallmark of a classic aloo samosa. In the end, we found that a wet dough, when rested long enough to fully hydrate the flour, created steam during frying that yielded crispy, bubbled and puffy samosas.

The Best Lemon Bars

It's tough to top a classic lemon bar, but we've done it! We kept the tender, buttery crust and bright filling of the original, and made a few improvements. For our luscious lemon layer, we employed a unique double-cooking method. Simmering first on the stovetop like lemon curd allows us to add butter, which balances the tart and sweet elements and adds a richer, smoother texture.

The Best Vinegar Coleslaw

We love the zippiness that a vinegar-based dressing brings to this coleslaw, making it the perfect partner for rich, meaty dishes like pulled pork or ribs. Cabbage can take lots of seasoning and lots of vinegar, so don&rsquot be bashful. But the real secret to this colorful coleslaw is the marinating time &mdash a long trip to the fridge softens up the veggies and gives them time to absorb the flavors of the vinaigrette. A drizzle of olive oil at the end balances the acidity.

The Best Butter Chicken

Butter chicken originated in a Delhi restaurant when the chef was looking for a way to serve unsold tandoori chicken from the night before. He created a mild tomato curry spiced with cinnamon, cardamom and cloves and finished with butter. It was an instant classic that we love to serve alongside basmati rice and plenty of naan to soak up the fragrant sauce.

The Best French Toast

Our favorite bread for making French toast is pain de mie for its neutral flavor and spongey texture, which helps it absorb the egg mixture without falling apart. It's sometimes hard to find, so you can substitute brioche for a richer and more decadent toast or challah for an all-purpose choice.

The Best Carrot Cake

Our classic carrot cake is nicely spiced with cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg and has toasted pecans both in the cake and on top. Plumped golden raisins and a full pound of carrots make it nice and moist while buttermilk lends tang and tenderness. Our homemade cream-cheese frosting has just the right amount of sweetness.

The Best Corn Casserole

We added Cheddar and chives to this classic and quick side that goes from mixing bowl to oven in less than 10 minutes. It bakes up golden brown and puffy &mdash perfect for a potluck or holiday gathering.

The Best Pecan Pie

This pie delivers plenty of classic flavors like brown sugar, vanilla and toasted nuts. We found that bourbon made a welcome addition. The alcohol bakes off leaving behind irresistible notes of smoke and caramel. Our all-butter crust perfectly balances the sweetness of the filling.

The Best Mashed Potatoes

This is our go-to recipe for classic mashed potatoes, made with plenty of butter and cream. To make them fluffy and flavorful, be sure to simmer them slowly and add plenty of salt to the cooking water. And don't skip the step of steaming the excess water off leaving too much moisture in the potatoes causes them to be loose and gluey.

The Best Stuffing

There's something for everyone in our festive stuffing. It's filled with satisfying ingredients like sausage and mushrooms, plus classic Thanksgiving flavors like onion, celery and lots of chopped herbs. We like it best when baked in a casserole dish and served alongside the turkey. This is also the safest way to prepare it.

The Best Egg Salad

While we love a jazzed up version of egg salad, we always come back to this one for its simplicity, clean flavors and sheer nostalgia. This is the best version of a classic egg salad. It's bright with herbs and the mayonnaise-to-egg ratio is just right, making it perfectly mound-able on a sandwich or bowl of greens.

The Best Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Do you like chewy cookies? Or do you prefer cakey ones? Our oatmeal-raisin cookies can be both! For a chewy cookie, bake them right away. For a cakey cookie, let the dough rest in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours (or overnight works even better) to allow the oatmeal to hydrate.

The Best Mulled Wine

We love a well-spiced, fragrant mulled wine and this one hits the spot. The spices steep in the cider to intensify their flavors before everything is combined to create a warming, winter drink.

The Best Green Bean Casserole

We bring extra umami (a savoriness) to a traditional green bean casserole with the addition of dried shiitake mushrooms. Once rehydrated, they turn soft and earthy, and their soaking liquid adds oomph to the sauce as well. Our fried onion topping is made from scratch &mdash first, a dip in buttermilk, then fried to crunchy perfection.

The Best Turkey Meatballs

These juicy meatballs with a tender, light texture are packed with flavorful herbs. The meat mixture is softer than you might expect, thanks to the addition of ricotta, but sacrificing a perfectly round shape is worth it. You'll make these turkey meatballs so often you just might forget about your beef meatball recipe.

The Best Chocolate Cake

This is not your everyday chocolate cake. It's a showstopper &mdash very tall and much more of a bakery-style cake than a cake from a box. The frosting has both melted chocolate for smoothness and cocoa for depth of flavor.

The Best Spinach Artichoke Dip

This is our best version of the classic party dip. It's savory and creamy with a slight tang from sour cream and Parmesan -- so hard to resist. We like to use frozen whole leaf spinach and chop it ourselves for more control over the finished texture of the dish.

The Best Peanut Butter Cookies

We wanted a super peanut buttery treat but found that store-bought peanut butter made the cookies a bit gummy when we used more than 1 cup. So we ground roasted peanuts ourselves and added that to the batter for an additional boost of flavor. Honey and melted butter add richness and create a soft and chewy cookie with an irresistible crackled exterior. We topped the dough balls with raw sugar for extra crunch and a hit of sweetness that balances the salt of the peanuts.

The Best Deviled Eggs

Our classic deviled eggs get their kick from mustard and hot sauce. We like the simplicity of the flavor &mdash it's the perfect recipe to use your imagination and add your favorite toppings or mix-ins.

The Best Angel Food Cake

Even though there are just a few ingredients in this simple cake, there are also a few techniques that will make or break it. First, be sure to use the correct pan -- an angel food cake pan -- and do not grease it. Additionally, superfine sugar, sifted cake flour and perfectly whipped egg whites are key components that set you up for success -- and set this cake apart from the rest.

The Best Bolognese

Our bolognese is rich and meaty, yet surprisingly light on the tomato. Instead, its base is made from a classic combination of wine and milk. The combination of pork, beef and pancetta adds complexity while a Parmesan rind lends even more flavor.

The Best Chocolate Lava Cakes

Go ahead and indulge in these perfectly rich and dreamy chocolate lava cakes! Bittersweet chocolate and espresso powder create a luscious and balanced batter that stays molten in the center during baking.

The Best Beef Stroganoff

We used a marbled, tender piece of ribeye as the star of this comfort food classic. Two kinds of mushrooms are cooked until crispy to add an extra element of flavor. The whole dish is brought together with a rich, tangy sauce made with sour cream and Dijon and served over egg noodles.

The Best Guacamole

Simple ingredients in perfect proportion make a this dip a crowd-pleasing favorite for any event. We decided not to use tomato in ours (it makes the guac watery) and included both onion and garlic for extra zip. A healthy dose of fresh lime juice balances and brightens the flavors.

The Best Pork Enchiladas

Enchiladas from the Mexican state of Oaxaca are made with a red chile sauce. Ours has raisins to pull the fruit flavors from the ancho chiles and add a touch of sweetness. The pork is braised with aromatics and seasonings that turns into a deeply flavored blended sauce. Frying the tortillas a bit before rolling them gives them a durability that is important when assembling the dish.

The Best Scones

The extra-rich taste of our cream scones comes from using milk powder in addition to the standard ingredients butter and cream. A light touch when combining the dough ensures a tender crumb.

The Best Chicken Marsala

This classic Italian-American dish is a nostalgic reminder of large family dinners of a bygone era. It's the ultimate crowd pleaser. The flavors from the marsala and cremini mushrooms bring a sweet earthiness to the sauce that really elevates simple seared chicken breasts.

The Best Lemon Meringue Pie

It's the stuff of dreams: a classic sweet and tart dessert with a foolproof meringue topping that won't weep! We use mostly butter in our from-scratch pie dough, but add a little vegetable shortening as well &mdash we found that this combination creates a crust that is both tender and flaky.

The Best Tuna Salad

While we love many kinds of tuna salad, this classic version tops them all. The crispy celery and red onion give add zest and crunch, while mayonnaise and touch of mustard marry it all together. The lemon juice is optional as it&rsquos not traditional, but we strongly recommend it to brighten up the flavors of the final dish.

The Best Crispy Tofu

The key to getting tofu nice and crispy is to first remove excess moisture. We wrap the block of tofu in a clean kitchen towel and place a heavy pan on top of it to press out as much water as possible. When searing the tofu, resist the urge to move it around. Instead, allow it to form a crust before flipping, and then again let it cook undisturbed on the other side until browned.

The Best Chicken Salad

Gently poaching chicken breasts in an aromatic broth yields tender morsels for folding into a bright and herby homemade dressing. Serve it solo on a bed of lettuce with sliced tomatoes or in half an avocado. It also makes a killer chicken club sandwich topped with crisp bacon and other sandwich fixings.

The Best Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies

These cookies are inspired by the thin and crispy style made popular by the Long Island bakery Tate's Bake Shop. In our version, we've upped the brown sugar, vanilla and chocolate chips for an even more flavorful and decadent treat.

The Best Granola

For our best granola, we wanted a crunchy, clustery version that wasn't too sweet. We created this simple but universally likeable recipe that's flavored with vanilla and a blend of brown sugar and maple syrup. We love its pure flavors and balance of salty and sweet. It is the perfect canvas for personalization, so we've included some ideas for mix-ins at the end of the recipe.

The Best Pie Dough for a Lattice Crust

We love this dough for making the lattice crust for many reasons. The combination of shortening and butter makes the dough incredibly easy to work with and forgiving when cutting and weaving. Plus, the added vodka provides tenderness and depth of flavor, making it perfect for a variety of pie fillings.

The Best French Onion Soup

This bistro classic is deceptively easy to make. It just takes a little time and a few good ingredients. We found that yellow onions, also known as Spanish onions, work best for this recipe. They have a nice balance of sweetness and bitterness and caramelize perfectly. Just don't take them too dark -- a nice golden brown is perfect. Good beef broth also makes a big difference. If you can't make your own, look for a high-quality prepared variety.

The Best Baked Beans

If you think baked beans only come from a can, you're in for a treat. Bacon, molasses and bourbon add depth and flavor to our classic recipe that's perfectly spiced with paprika, mustard and Worcestershire. A bit of brown sugar adds just the right amount of sweetness and to keep things easy, the beans require no soaking! They get tender and delicious right in the oven.

The Best French Toast Casserole

There's no need to get up early on the weekend to make brunch for a crowd. With this rich, custardy French toast casserole, nearly all the prep is done in advance. Simply assemble and refrigerate overnight. About an hour before brunch time, just pop it into the oven. Whip up a fast and easy banana-caramel topping and bask in the praise of your well-fed guests.

The Best Banana Cake

This banana cake is delectably moist, perfectly sweet and easy to make. Dark brown sugar and sour cream add depth to the batter, and we added melted butter instead of vegetable oil for a flavor boost. Fluffy cream cheese frosting and swirls of dulce de leche will make you go back for seconds. We also upped the ante by using bananas in two ways -- fresh bananas are mixed into the cake while maple-candied banana chips create a crunchy topping.

The Best Banana Pudding

This creamy banana dessert is our very favorite version, piled high with layers of just-ripe bananas, rich vanilla pudding and tender cookies. We used vanilla bean paste instead of extract in our homemade filling for a bold flavor boost and topped the pudding with swirls of freshly whipped cream. When it all comes together, it's dreamy, luscious and feeds a crowd!

The Best Parker House Rolls

These Parker House rolls are super indulgent thanks to plenty of butter mixed in and brushed on top. Milk and eggs enrich the dough, lending a perfectly tender texture. A sprinkle of flaky sea salt adds a welcome bit of contrast and crunch. These rolls are best served fresh and warm.

The Best Homemade Applesauce

After tasting the pure apple flavor of this homemade sauce, you just might never go back to the store-bought kind. Supermarket applesauce can be loaded with added sweeteners and flavorings. We use only a little sugar, plus lemon juice, salt and cinnamon, providing a balanced flavor and the perfect amount of sweetness.

The Best Roasted Asparagus

The perfect roasted asparagus should be lightly browned and tender, yet bright green and crisp. Roasting the spears at a high temperature helps achieve this. We also browned grated Parmesan to make a nutty, crumbly frico topping. Wait until ready to serve to top the vegetables so the crisped cheese stays crunchy.

The Best Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Olive oil, salt and pepper let the earthy flavor of the sprouts shine as they get crisp and golden in the oven. Heating the pan and laying the veggies flat-side down is the secret to achieving maximum browning -- and don't toss the loose leaves that fall off during trimming. They become toasted and crisp -- the best part! To make these extra special, we topped them with homemade Parmesan breadcrumbs.

The Best Fruitcake

Fruitcakes have become the punchline of many a holiday joke, but this recipe will give the notorious seasonal gift a whole new reputation. Filled with loads of real dried fruit and nuts along with brandy, warm spices and citrus, this cake tastes like the holidays. The recipe makes two loaves so you can gift one.

The Best Pumpkin Cheesecake

There's no better way to celebrate pumpkin-spice season! With swirls of pumpkin filling, caramel and a gingersnap crust, this autumnal cheesecake is a delight. We start by whipping up a classic cheesecake batter, then add pumpkin and warm spices to half the batch. Both are used to create a unique bullseye pattern. Nutty spiced seeds add crunch. Make sure all the ingredients are at room temperature -- this ensures that the cheesecake is smooth and creamy.

The Best Tiramisu

Making this classic Italian dessert is surprisingly easy. We start the custard with a traditional Marsala-flavored zabaglione -- a cooked mixture of egg yolks and sugar. Then we lighten it with tangy mascarpone cheese, which provides just the right creamy, mousse-like texture. Once assembled, the ladyfingers soften sufficiently after 4 hours in the refrigerator, but if you can wait longer, the flavors will meld even more .

The Best Chicken and Dumplings

This is pure comfort food at its finest. Tender chunks of chicken and vegetables come together in a creamy, richly-flavored sauce with pillowy dumplings baked right on top. It's hearty but not too heavy and comes together from scratch in about an hour.

The Best Meat and Potatoes

This recipe will please not only the meat-and-potato lover in your house but will also please the cook. It comes together in just 30 minutes with minimal cleanup! We seared tender, juicy strip steaks in a hot cast-iron skillet, then made a fast pan sauce with mustard, wine and herbs. Mashed potatoes are kicked up with sour cream, horseradish and spinach for a stick-to-your-ribs side dish that's a cinch to prepare in the microwave.

The Best Apple Crisp

If you just went apple picking, here's the perfect recipe to enjoy the fruits of your labor. We've included two varieties of fresh apples, plus warm spices and tangy cider. The sweet, buttery crumble topping is flavored with brown sugar and studded with nutty pecans for the ultimate easy apple dessert.

The Best Risotto

With relatively few ingredients (none of them being cream), the success of a classic creamy risotto depends largely on technique. We've tested all the methods and narrowed it down to a few easy-to-follow steps that will help you achieve perfectly cooked Italian-style rice every time. This basic recipe is delicious on its own and makes a wonderful base to add your favorite vegetables or protein.

The Best Shepherd's Pie

We stuck with tradition and made our shepherd's pie with lamb, but you could easily swap in ground beef. The saucy filling is packed with tender vegetables and the creamy topping is inspired by the Irish potato dish, colcannon, and is filled with cabbage, leeks and cheese.

The Best Tomato Sauce

There are about as many versions of tomato sauce as there are cooks in the world. The Italian-American heritage of one of our test-kitchen team members informed the development of this recipe, leading us to a version of her family's favorite tomato sauce. A variety of canned tomatoes adds richness. A long simmer helps the flavors meld and results in a sauce that is perfect on pasta or nestled around chicken cutlets or meatballs.

The Best Irish Soda Bread

We prefer the slightly sweet American version of this classic Irish quick bread, so we added dried currants and a small amount of sugar. Buttermilk and baking soda give the loaf plenty of lift and butter gives it a moist crumb.

The Best Cranberry Sauce

Our classic cranberry sauce has the ideal texture of tart whole berries suspended in a sweet jammy sauce we added citrus peel for a little extra brightness. Don't be tempted to skip the salt and and pepper at the end. It may seem a bit odd, but salt brings out the fruitiness of the berries while pepper gives the sauce a warm and spicy finish.

The Best Corned Beef and Cabbage with Horseradish Cream

Our recipe for corned beef and cabbage is so delicious, we'd like to eat it year-round. The whole spices included in the braising liquid are our secret ingredients (the tangy horseradish cream doesn't hurt, either!). Cabbage and potatoes are cooked in the same pot as the brisket, so everything comes out perfectly tender and infused with flavor.

The Best Roasted Fennel

Fennel sometimes plays second fiddle to other vegetables, but it is the true star in this simple but impressive side dish. Roasting the fennel until tender and almost creamy mellows its usual licorice flavor and brings out a touch of natural sweetness. Even if you don't normally like fennel, give this delicious dish a try. You might be surprised.

The Best Pulled Pork

Chipotle powder, apple cider and ketchup create the perfect balance of smoky, sweet and tangy without the need for a smoker or grill! For our classic, satisfying pulled pork, all that's required is a flavorful homemade rub and a long trip to the oven to cook low and slow until it's meltingly tender. Eat it as-is, or pile onto a potato roll with your favorite toppings for the ultimate sandwich. Coleslaw is a traditional accompaniment, and we love a vinegary one for the way it cuts through the richness of the pork.


Easy Braised Artichokes with Lemon + Macadamia Nut Oil

Super easy stovetop braised artichokes.


Artichokes.

We all really love to eat them.

But a lot of us are intimidated to cook them.

These super easy braised artichokes everybody!

Cooking artichokes at home has never been easier.

These braised artichokes will change your life.

I am Italian. I didn’t grow up eating a lot of meat and potato dinners, casseroles or pre-packaged meals. I grew up eating a typical Mediterranean diet including a lot of pasta, grilled seasonal vegetables, and artichokes. I have been eating artichokes since I was a baby, and they were some of the first things I learned how to cook. These stuffed artichokes should definitely be tackled after you master this braised artichoke.

Because of my culinary upbringing artichokes and I have always had a real easy relationship. But, I know they’re really intimating to a lot of people. And rightfully so. They require a little extra love, I get it. Whether you’re an artichoke pro or a total newbie, this braising recipe is one we should all have in our wheelhouse. It’s fast and delicious and surprisingly easy. Below are a few pro-tips to get started.

PRO-TIP ONE.
Pick a great artichoke.

A sign of a healthy, fresh choke is one with tightly-packed, bright green leaves. Something to keep in mind is that artichokes are heavily sprayed vegetables. If you can find and afford organic ones that’s best. If you can’t, no biggie, just give pro-tip four a little extra love.

PRO-TIP TWO.
Trim the artichoke.

Whether you are stuffing or braising or otherwise you’ll need to trim your artichoke first. Place the artichoke on its side and slice off the stem so it has a flat bottom. Then peel off the layer of leaves around the base. Next cut off the top quarter, so the top is flat. Lastly take a pair of kitchen shears and trim the sharp points off each leaf.

PRO-TIP THREE.
Clean the artichoke.

Depending on your cooking method or desire this step is optional. But do this if you are looking to remove the choke itself, a tiny inner section of leaves and hairs. Cut the artichoke in half you will see a defined line that separates the choke from the heart. This artichoke image illustrates this beautifully. Take a small spoon and at the line press inwards and scoop out. The choke will come out with ease.

PRO-TIP FOUR.
Bath your beauty.

As I mentioned, artichokes are pretty dirty vegetables. Whether they’re heavily sprayed or organic, bugs, dirt and other debris can be trapped inside each leaf layer. I like to give my chokes a nice bath after I’ve trimmed them. Fill a bowl with cold water, and juice from two lemons. Submerge the artichokes in the water for at about five minutes and then rinse well.

This braised artichoke recipe is in partnership with Mountain Rose Herbs. I chose to finish the artichokes with some fresh lemon juice because that flavor pairs beautifully with their organic Macadamia Nut Oil. Macadamia nut oil has a beautiful nutty, but not overpowering scent. And a light body which makes it a perfect finishing oil.

I completed the dish with a generous sprinkle of Cyprus Flake Salt. Cyprus flake salt is the most beautiful salt I have ever seen. A true Mediterranean delight, known for its dazzling and distinctive pyramid shape, light texture and mild taste. I could put this on everything. If you want to up your cooking game you need this salt in your kitchen right now.


Cheese Pierogi

For the dough: Sift flour into a bowl and mix with salt. In the center make a well and add the egg into it. Mix together, gradually adding about 1/8 liter (approximately 4 ounces) of water and knead to a smooth, firm dough. Wrap dough in plastic wrap and let rest for 1 hour under a warmed, upturned bowl.

For the filling: Combine Tilsit cheese with eggs, season with salt and pepper and add as many bread crumbs to make a moist, moldable paste. Roll out dough on a floured surface in portions and cut out thin out circles of about 7 cm (approximately 2 3/4 inch). Put 1 tablespoon of filling on the circles, fold them into crescents, press edges firmly and decorate with a fork. Heat salted water to a boil and cook Pierogi in portions. Once they reach the surface, reduce heat and cook for about 8 minutes. Lift out with a slotted spoon and drain. Fry in hot butter until golden brown and serve.


Potato pierogi served in a nut artichoke bath recipe - Recipes

In the bowl of an electric mixer, place 1 cup flour, the yeast and 1 teaspoon of granulated white sugar. Stir to combine well.

In a pyrex measuring cup, combine milk with water and heat in the microwave until lukewarm (not hot). Pour the liquid over the flour/yeast/sugar mixture. Mix well and allow to stand in a warm place for 30 minutes.

Beat the eggs until they are light and creamy. Add them to the flour mixture, along with the softened butter, and all of the remaining flour and sugar.

Using the dough hook, knead the dough until it becomes smooth and elastic (about 4-8 minutes).

Place dough into a separate bowl which has been coated with butter or oil, turning the dough to coat the surface well so that it won't dry out. Cover loosely with plastic wrap or a damp clean cloth and set the bowl in a warm place free from draft to rise until doubled in size.

After dough has risen (about 90 minutes or so - depending on the room temperature) knead the dough (by hand) on a clean work surface for 2-3 minutes, then divide it into 15 or 16 balls. Place them on 1 or 2 buttered baking sheets. Cover loosely and allow to rise a final time for about 30 minutes or until doubled in size.

Brush the buns with a little beaten egg (or you can also use a spoonful of cream). Sprinkle the tops with crushed sugar cubes or coarse Turbinado sugar.

Bake at 400F for 15-20 minutes or until tops are light golden brown.

Note: 2 cake of fresh yeast may be substituted for the active dry yeast add it to the lukewarm water/milk at the start. It will take a longer time to rise but will develop a nice "bakery" flavor.

This recipe has origins which date back to 1679 and are still served in the Pump Room in Bath where they are a favorite to this day.