Traditional recipes

The Food Almanac: Wednesday, April 17, 2013

The Food Almanac: Wednesday, April 17, 2013


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

In The Food Almanac, Tom Fitzmorris of the online newsletter The New Orleans Menu notes food facts and sayings.

Food Inventions
On this day in 1810, one Lewis M. Norton in Goshen, Connecticut, patented a form for cheese that created what became known as the "pineapple cheese." It was shaped like a pineapple, but didn't taste like one. Lewis and his cousin Alexander Norton went on to become what were the first manufacturers and marketers of cheese in America, buying milk from farmers all around the area.

Today's Flavor
Probably because of Norton's invention, today is said to be Cheese Ball Day. Cheese balls turn up frequently at gatherings in people's homes, usually brought by a well-meaning friend. We'd say I don't know who actually likes cheese balls, but in fact, we do. Philadelphia cream cheese, cheddar, herbs, garlic, nuts on the outside. we don't get it, but this close relative loves to make them and people do eat them. But has anyone ever really had a hunger that could only be satisfied by sticking a blunt knife into a cheese ball and spreading it across a cracker?

Much more interesting are spheres made of more delicious things. So we're thankful to celebrate Crawfish Boulette Day, which arrives a little ahead of Crawfish Bisque Day (April 22). Crawfish bisque is traditionally served with stuffed crawfish heads, but both the stuffing (while making) and the unstuffing (while eating) of the heads are messy and inconvenient. On the other hand, you can put all the same ingredients into a crawfish boulette, add it at the table, and have something much better. These also make great appetizers served with hollandaise, remoulade, or tartar sauce. Go to my recipe for crawfish boulettes.

The Old Kitchen Sage Sez:
If you must have crawfish heads for you to accept my crawfish bisque as authentic, then you go in there and stuff the %#[email protected]& things. I've got better things to do.

Deft Dining Rule #294
If a food has a shell that must be removed before it can be eaten, it had better be really delicious.

Edible Dictionary
pate brisee, [PAH-tay-bree-ZAY], French, n.--The French term for what we call pie dough in the U.S., pate brisee literally means "short pastry." "Short" here is the same meaning as it does in "shortening," meaning that the flour making up the dough is both held together and, after baking, made tender in texture. The other ingredients are salt, sugar, and water--but not much of any of that. The trick is to kind of pushthe dough both sideways and down against the sides of the bowl while mixing it. It takes a knack which, frankly, I do not have. Another difference between bakers and mortals.

Gourmet Gazetteer
Drink Creek is in north-central Colorado, about ten miles south of the Wyoming state line, and a 138-mile drive from Denver. It rises in one of the loftiest and most rugged parts of the Rockies, at about 10,000 feet. It drops 1600 feet into a swampy area studded with small lakes before being absorbed by the Laramie River, which flows into the North Platte, the Missouri, and the Mississippi. Drink Creek's water, then passes (very appropriately) by the French Quarter. The nearest place to to get a drink--let alone a full meal--is the Drifters Cook House in Walden, seventeen miles away from the mouth of Drink Creek.

Avid Eaters In The Movies
Arthur Lake, the guy who played Dagwood in the Blondie movies and TV show, was born today in 1905. He portrayed Dagwood as a complete nincompoop, and was very funny. As in the comic strip, Lake's Dagwood was always completely distracted from whatever he was doing by the appearance of food.

Food Namesakes
Actor Sean Bean was born on this day in 1959. He was in the Lord of the Rings series, among others. . Victoria "Posh Spice" Adams, singer in the Spice Girls, was born today in 1974. .Daffy Duck first appeared in Porky's Duck Hunt, a cartoon that came out on this date in 1937. .Nancy Hogshead, who was an Olympic swimmer in 1984, then became a model, was born today in 1962. . Hamilton Fish, one of many American politicians to bear that name, was born in 1849 on this date.

Words To Eat By
"A poet's hope: to be, like some valley cheese, local, but prized elsewhere."--W.H. Auden.


The Best Free Food Deals This Week: April 11 &ndash 17

April -- or more specifically, the April temperatures -- have been failing pretty miserably when it comes to satisfying our hunger for spring. Luckily, the month is making up for it by satisfying our literal hunger with more food deals and steals than we can hardly keep track of. (We are keeping track though, because we'll be darned if we miss out on free food.)

Arby's

This is a good week to treat yourself to a classic roast beef sandwich, or a beef 'n cheddar sandwich, at Arby's, since either menu item will score you a free small fry and drink to wash it all down. All you have to do is show this coupon when you stop in now through April 12th and you'll be on your way to fast food bliss.

Au Bon Pain

If you just so happen to find yourself craving a cold caffeinated beverage on April 12th between 2 - 5 p.m., you're in luck. Au Bon Pain will be offering customers completely free -- as in no purchase necessary -- iced coffee and iced tea to give them something to look forward during the midday slump when we could all use a little pick-me-up.

Ben & Jerry's

The only thing that's better than ice cream is free ice cream. Ben & Jerry's gets that, and is granting our wish by giving us "Free Cone Day." When you stop in the ice cream shop between 12 - 8 p.m. on April 12th, you can grab yourself a free cone of flavors like cherry garcia and chocolate chip cookie dough.

Bob Evans

Anytime you can get a full portion of food for the price of a half portion, you know you're doing dining-out the right way. Now through April 17th, Bob Evans is offering 50% off adult entrees with the purchase of another adult entree and two drinks with this coupon. There are very few reasons to resist a plate of sausage gravy 'n biscuits anyway, but now you have one more reason to cave.

Jack in the Box

Brace yourselves for curly fries galore. From now through April 18th, Jack in the Box is giving you a free medium -- none of that small nonsense -- order of their seasoned curly fries with the purchase of any other item on the menu when you present this coupon. This is living, guys.

Taco Bell

All April long, Taco Bell is making it a whole lot easier to satisfy your taco cravings with $2 off mobile orders of $10 or more. We can't say for sure, but we think that's justification for having quesaritos every day until May, right?

If you find yourself craving a midday caffeine fix on Thursday, April 14 -- hint: you will -- drop into your nearest Wawa to celebrate the chain's 52nd anniversary with a free (any size) cup of your favorite coffee blend. You'll want to savor every sip though -- there's a one-cup limit per customer.

BONUS: National Cheese Fondue and National Grilled Cheese Day

If you weren't already aware, this week is a big one for cheesy food holidays. Monday is National Cheese Fondue Day and Tuesday is National Grilled Cheese Day so we scoped out a coule of places with deals so you can celebrate cheese in all its glory.

The Melting Pot

The Melting Pot has a history of celebrating National Cheese Fondue Day in style and this year is no different. If you're a cheese lover you can get free cheese fondue for free for two vouchers in celebration of the holiday. Vouchers will be given to the first 25,000 people who sign up for its Club Fondue on Monday (if you sign up before you won't be eligible) and will be redeemable between April 18 and June 30.

The Melt

If you find yourself in Colorado or California this month, make sure to stop by The Melt and snap a pic of your grilled cheese. If you share it on social media with the hashtags #saycheese and #themelt, you'll be entered to win a $50 gift card so you can make grilled cheese your staple food.


APRIL 17 - Today in Food History

1810 Lewis Mills Norton of Goshen, Connecticut was issued the first U.S. patent for ‘pineapple cheese’. The popular cheese was sold in blocks shaped like pineapples. [ConnecticutHistory.org]

1843 Samuel Morey died (born Oct 23, 1762). American inventor. His first patent, issued on January 26, 1793 (No. X51), was for a steam powered roasting spit, and was signed by George Washington.

1917 The first Del Monte brand national advertisement appeared in the Saturday Evening Post.

1937 Daffy Duck makes his debut appearance in 'Porky,s Duck Hunt’

1958 The Brussels World's Fair, Expo 58 (Universal and International Exhibition) opened in Belgium (closed Oct 19, 1958). The overall theme was "A World View, A New Humanism." It was the first major world's fair after World War II.

1979 The Swedish brand 'Absolut Vodka' was first exported to U.S.

1991 The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 3,000 for the first time (3,004.46).

1996 Arnold Neustadter Died. He was the inventor of the Rolodex rotating card file.

2006 The price of oil closed above $70 for the first time ($70.40).

2008 The musical 'A Catered Affair' opened at the Walter Kerr Theatre in New York City.

2015 The SpaceX supply ship brought groceries, supplies and an ISSpresso espresso machine to the International Space Station.

2020 Land O'Lakes butter will remove the American Indian maiden its butter box, in use since 1928 the logo has long been criticized.
(See also Land O’Lakes History)

2020 Coronavirus: More than 22 million Americans have lost their jobs in the last 4 weeks Japan extends state of emergency to entire country.


Baseball History on April 17

Baseball Births on April 17 / Baseball Deaths on April 17

Players Born on, Died on, Debut on, Finished on April 17

Baseball history on April 17 includes a total of 41 Major League baseball players born that day of the year, 25 Major League baseball players who died on that date, 332 baseball players who made their Major League debut on that date, and 37 Major League baseball players who appeared in their final game that date.

Bill James, on the same page of the same book we used at the top of this page, said, "But as I began to do research on the history of baseball (in order to discuss the players more intelligently) I began to feel that there was a history a baseball that had not been written at that time, a history of good and ordinary players, a history of being a fan, a history of games that meant something at the time but mean nothing now." To that end, I have created Baseball Almanac. A site to worship baseball. A site by a fan who is trying to tell the history of good and ordinary baseball players.


About oremus Bible Browser

Oremus Bible Browser v3.0

oremus Bible Browser is copyright © 1998&ndash2019 Simon Kershaw [email protected]>. All rights reserved.

Some of the texts included in the oremus Bible Browser are copyright © the individual copyright holders, and are used by permission.

Donations

The oremus Bible Browser is, and always has been, offered free of any charge. If you would like to make a contribution to costs then donations may be made via PayPal or Amazon to [email protected] To use PayPal, simply browse to paypal.me/SimonKershaw, enter the amount and click or tap the &ldquoNext&rdquo button. Do select &ldquoSending to a friend or family&rdquo: if you select &ldquoPaying for an item or service&rdquo PayPal will deduct a fee.

Or you can log in to your Paypal account, and select &ldquopay or send money&rdquo and then &ldquoSending to a friend or family&rdquo enter the email address [email protected], and specify your donation. PayPal does not charge a fee for this transaction if you select &ldquoPaying for an item or service&rdquo they will.

Alternatively, Amazon gift vouchers are a convenient method and can be purchased online at Amazon and delivered by email to [email protected] . Please do use amazon.co.uk and not amazon.com or another Amazon site to buy vouchers. amazon.com vouchers can only be redeemed or spent at the US amazon.com (and similarly for other countries).


UPI Almanac for Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Today is Tuesday, April 17, the 107th day of 2018 with 258 to follow.

The moon is waxing. Morning stars are Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Neptune and Saturn. Evening stars are Jupiter and Venus.

Those born on this date are under the sign of Aries. They include American industrialist and financier J.P. Morgan in 1837 baseball Hall of Fame member Cap Anson in 1852 Danish author Karen Blixen (Out of Africa), who wrote under the name Isak Dinesen, in 1885 actor William Holden in 1918 music promoter Don Kirshner in 1934 musician Jan Hammer in 1948 (age 70) actor Olivia Hussey in 1951 (age 67) actor Sean Bean in 1959 (age 59) singer Maynard James Keenan (Tool, A Perfect Circle, Pucifer) in 1964 (age 54) actor Henry Ian Cusick in 1967 (age 51) singer Liz Phair in 1967 (age 51) rapper Redman, born Reggie Noble, in 1970 (age 48) actor Jennifer Garner in 1972 (age 46) singer/model Victoria Beckham in 1974 (age 44) actor Rooney Mara in 1985 (age 33).

In 1421, the sea broke the dikes at Dort, Holland, drowning an estimated 100,000 people.

In 1521, the Roman Catholic Church excommunicated Martin Luther after he refused to admit to charges of heresy.

In 1524, Italian navigator Giovanni Verrazano discovered New York Harbor.

In 1790, U.S. statesman, printer, scientist and writer Benjamin Franklin died in Philadelphia at age 84.

In 1912, the sister ship of the doomed RMS Titanic, the Olympic, radioed in that survivors of the ocean liner sinking were rescued and safely on board the RMS Carpathia.

In 1961, a force of anti-Castro rebels began the Bay of Pigs Invasion in an attempt to overthrow Cuba's new communist government.

In 1969, a jury found Sirhan B. Sirhan guilty of first-degree murder for the assassination of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy.

In 1970, with the world anxiously watching on television, Apollo 13, a U.S. lunar spacecraft that sustained a severe malfunction on its journey to the moon, safely returned to Earth.

In 1989, the Polish labor union Solidarity was granted legal status after nearly a decade of struggle and suppression -- clearing the way for the downfall of the country's Communist Party.

In 1993, a federal jury convicted two Los Angeles police officers and acquitted two others of violating the civil rights of Rodney King during his 1991 arrest and beating.

In 2003, billionaire philanthropist John Paul Getty Jr. died in London at the age of 70.

In 2004, the Israeli army confirmed it had killed Abdel Aziz Rantisi, Hamas co-founder and its leader in Gaza, in a missile strike. Two others also died with Rantisi, who had opposed any compromise with Israel.

In 2012, U.S. investor Warren Buffett, one of the world's wealthiest people, said he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

In 2013, an explosion at a West, Texas, fertilizer plant killed 15 people, injured dozens and caused massive property damage in the community.

In 2014, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Colombian author of magical realism novels One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera, died. He was 87.

A thought for the day: Rudyard Kipling wrote, "Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind."


Research

Battling Public Health Misinformation Online

Social media and web-based news channels became a communication superhighway for correct and incorrect public health information during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study of this vast amount of information, known as infodemiology, is critical to building public health interventions to combat misinformation and help individuals, groups, and communities navigate and distill crucial public health messages.

In an effort to combat COVID-19 misinformation, a group of women researchers, including nurse scientists from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, launched the Dear Pandemic social media campaign in March 2020. It delivers curated, comprehensive, and timely information about the COVID-19 pandemic in a question-and-answer format. Complex topics such as COVID-19 aerosol transmission, risk reduction strategies to avoid infection, and excess mortality are explained in common language and shared widely.

Now with more than 100,000 followers and accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, the campaign has an international and multilingual impact offering important public health insight via social media. An article in the journal Public Health Nursing describes how the campaign is combating misinformation about COVID-19.

&ldquoDear Pandemic has demonstrated that consistently publishing high-quality content outside a peer-reviewed venue can result in incredible impact&mdashpersonal behavior change, informed nodes of trust to further disseminate factual information, and resources for community providers navigating constantly evolving knowledge,&rdquo said Penn Nursing&rsquos Ashley Z. Ritter, the article&rsquos lead author.

Dear Pandemic is an example of necessary low-barrier information exchange with the public and a tool for community providers like nurses to stay informed of breaking news. Increased engagement of nurses in endeavors like Dear Pandemic amplifies the impact of collective interdisciplinary efforts to educate the public, contain misinformation, and motivate individual and systemic action, the article explains.

&ldquoNow is the time for nurses to flex their communication and trust muscles in both traditional and innovative ways to advance the health of the public through trusted, actionable messaging in addition to exceptional patient care,&rdquo said co-author Shoshana Aronowitz, a fellow of the National Clinician Scholars Program.

The article &ldquoDear Pandemic: Nurses as Key Partners in Fighting the COVID-19 Infodemic&rdquo is available online.

Additional coauthors of the article include Alison Buttenheim of Penn Nursing as well as scholars at Dartmouth College, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Oxford, Columbia University, Stony Brook University, and Thomas Jefferson University.

Preventing Evictions Remains Critical to Controlling COVID-19, Study Finds

Renter protection policies that have curbed mass evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have played a key role in preventing the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in U.S. cities, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.

Using an epidemiological model to predict how evictions and eviction moratoria would impact the epidemic, the researchers found, for instance, that in a city of 1 million in which 1% of households experience eviction monthly, the evictions could lead to up to 49,000 excess COVID-19 infections. In Philadelphia alone, a fivefold increase in evictions, predicted by some economic analyses, could lead to 53,000 extra infections. The study was led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

&ldquoOur model shows clearly that policies to stem evictions are not only a warranted but a necessary component of COVID control. As long as the virus is circulating, ending these protections could have devastating implications in the United States,&rdquo said co-senior author Michael Z. Levy, an associate professor of epidemiology in Penn&rsquos Perelman School of Medicine.

Record levels of unemployment have put millions of Americans at risk of losing their homes throughout 2020 and 2021. At the start of the pandemic, many cities and states enacted temporary legislation banning evictions, some of which has since expired. On September 4, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) imposed a national moratorium on evictions, which was extended in March 2021. In addition to a number of well-documented adverse outcomes, evictions would also have outsized repercussions on the growth rate of the COVID-19 epidemic, Dr. Levy and his research team predicted in the summer of 2020. The effect emerges from increases in household sizes&mdashdata suggest that, once evicted, households tend to &ldquodouble-up,&rdquo moving in with friends or family. Household transmission can also limit or delay the effects of measures like lockdowns, which aim to decrease the contact rate in the general population.

To quantify this effect, the researchers modeled evictions that resulted in the &ldquodoubling up&rdquo of households by merging each evicted household with one randomly selected household in the network. They then adjusted the number of contacts outside the household over the course of the simulations to capture the effects of lockdown measures and their subsequent relaxation. They found that with a low monthly eviction rate of 0.25%, an estimated 0.5% more of the population could become infected with COVID-19&mdashor about 5,000 excess cases per 1 million residents&mdashcompared to if there were no evictions. A 1% monthly eviction rate could lead to 19,000 to 49,000 excess cases. With an eviction rate of 2% per month, that number jumps to 50,000 to 100,000 excess infections in a single city.

&ldquoOur results suggest that the CDC-mandated national order prohibiting evictions from September 4-December 31, 2020 likely prevented thousands of excess COVID-19 infections for every million metropolitan residents,&rdquo said the study authors.

The research team therefore adjusted their model to evaluate the effect of evictions in Philadelphia, which has one of the highest eviction rates among large U.S. cities. In July 2020, Philadelphia&rsquos City Council passed the Emergency Housing Protection Act in an effort to prevent evictions during the pandemic. The city was sued by a lobbyist group, which questioned whether the legislation was of broad societal interest, rather than protecting a narrow class of residents. This prompted Dr. Levy&rsquos team to assess the claim.

Their simulations showed that allowing evictions to resume in Philadelphia could substantially increase the number of COVID-19 infections in the city, and that these increases would be felt among various socioeconomic populations, including those experiencing a low number of evictions. With evictions occurring at only their pre-pandemic rates, the epidemic would infect an extra 0.3% of the Philadelphia population, or 4,700 individuals. However, the researchers point out, many economic analyses predict the eviction crisis could be much higher if allowed to resume, due to the economic fallout associated with COVID-19. With a five-fold increase in evictions, excess infections would increase by 53,000 in the city.

“Unrules” Are Ubiquitous in U.S. Regulatory System and Require Greater Oversight

In &ldquoUnrules,&rdquo recently published in the Stanford Law Review, Cary Coglianese, the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and professor of political science Gabriel Scheffler of the University of Miami School of Law and Daniel Walters of Penn State Law present their findings from the &ldquofirst systematic empirical investigation of the hidden world of unrules&rdquo: evidence that challenges the widespread perception of the U.S. regulatory system as inflexible and burdensome.

By contrast, the authors show that the system has tremendous opportunities for flexibility, or what the authors call &ldquoobligation alleviation.&rdquo But Dr. Coglianese also notes that the study &ldquooffers reasons to worry about a bias in our administrative law system that allows agencies bent on alleviating regulatory responsibilities to escape from the same kind of procedural protections and judicial scrutiny that apply when agencies impose new obligations.&rdquo

The authors define &ldquounrules&rdquo as &ldquothe decisions that agencies make to lift or limit the scope of a regulatory restriction, for instance through waivers, exemptions, and exceptions.&rdquo Although such unrules can have positive effects such as reducing burdens on regulated entities or making law more efficient through the conservation of government resources, if left unchecked, they can &ldquofacilitate undue business influence over the law, weaken regulatory schemes, and even undermine the rule of law.&rdquo

By applying the study&rsquos &ldquocomputational linguistic approach&rdquo to the Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, and the U.S. Code, Dr. Coglianese and his coauthors reveal that &ldquothere exists one obligation-alleviating word for approximately every five to six obligation-imposing words in federal law.&rdquo The authors show both the ubiquity of unrules throughout federal regulatory law and how these obligation-alleviating tools operate with much less oversight on regulators&rsquo discretion.

&ldquoAs a result, a major form of agency power remains hidden from view and relatively unencumbered by law,&rdquo they write. &ldquoRecognizing the central role that unrules play in our regulatory system reveals the need to reorient administrative law and incorporate unrules more explicitly into its assumptions, doctrines, and procedures.&rdquo


UPI Almanac for Monday, April 17, 2017

Today is Monday, April 17, the 107th day of 2017 with 258 to follow.

The moon is waning. Morning stars are Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Venus. Evening stars are Mercury, Mars and Jupiter.

Those born on this date are under the sign of Aries. They include American industrialist and financier J.P. Morgan in 1837 baseball Hall of Fame member Cap Anson in 1852 Danish author Karen Blixen (Out of Africa), who wrote under the name Isak Dinesen, in 1885 novelist and playwright Thornton Wilder in 1897 actor William Holden in 1918 television journalist Harry Reasoner in 1923 music promoter Don Kirshner in 1934 musician Jan Hammer in 1948 (age 69) actor Olivia Hussey in 1951 (age 66) actor Sean Bean in 1959 (age 58) actor Henry Ian Cusick in 1967 (age 50) singer Liz Phair in 1967 (age 50) singer/model Victoria Beckham in 1974 (age 43) actor Rooney Mara in 1985 (age 32).

In 1421, the sea broke the dikes at Dort, Holland, drowning an estimated 100,000 people.

In 1521, The Roman Catholic Church excommunicated Martin Luther after he refused to admit to charges of heresy.

In 1524, Italian navigator Giovanni Verrazano discovered New York Harbor.

In 1790, U.S. statesman, printer, scientist and writer Benjamin Franklin died in Philadelphia at age 84.

In 1912, the sister ship of the doomed RMS Titanic, the Olympic, radioed in that survivors of the ocean liner sinking were rescued and safely on board the RMS Carpathia.

In 1961, a force of anti-Castro rebels began the Bay of Pigs Invasion in an attempt to overthrow Cuba's new communist government.

In 1970, with the world anxiously watching on television, Apollo 13, a U.S. lunar spacecraft that sustained a severe malfunction on its journey to the moon, safely returned to Earth.

In 1989, the Polish labor union Solidarity was granted legal status after nearly a decade of struggle and suppression -- clearing the way for the downfall of the country's Communist Party.

In 2001, Mississippi voters, by a 2-1 ratio, decided to keep their state flag, which includes the Confederate battle cross in the upper left corner.

In 2003, billionaire philanthropist John Paul Getty Jr. died in London at the age of 70.

In 2004, the Israeli army confirmed it had killed Abdel Aziz Rantisi, Hamas co-founder and its leader in Gaza, in a missile strike. Two others also died with Rantisi, who had opposed any compromise with Israel.

In 2006, a bus carrying Mexican tourists plunged nearly 800 feet off a cliff in eastern Mexico, between Vera Cruz and Mexico City, killing at least 63 people.

In 2012, U.S. investor Warren Buffett, one of the world's wealthiest people, said he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

In 2013, an explosion at a West, Texas, fertilizer plant killed 15 people, injured dozens and caused massive property damage in the community.

In 2014, Chelsea Clinton announced in New York that she and her husband, Marc Mezvinsky, "are very excited that we have our first child arriving later this year." Daughter Charlotte was born Sept. 26, 2014.

A thought for the day: Rudyard Kipling wrote, "Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind."


The Best Recipes, Products And Hacks We Tried This Past Week (April 13-17)

There’s no “right” way to navigate this coronavirus pandemic everyone lives and copes differently. That being said, fostering a sense of community may make getting through this time a little bit easier.

Enter this weekly guide. Every Sunday, we’ll bring you a shortlist of products, routines, workouts, recipes, apps and other things we tried the previous week that make life easier during this universally stressful time. Take a look at the suggestions below:

Activity Recommendations

Participate in bar trivia from your couch.

The bar in my neighborhood where I usually do trivia started hosting it virtually. My team and I communicated over Slack and the host read out clues and answers over Zoom. They also did home delivery of food and their cocktail menu, so I had a burger, fries and an old fashioned while we played.

It wasn’t quite like the real thing, of course, but it felt good to be doing something in my community and supporting a local business. I’ve seen a lot of similar happenings with other bars on my Instagram, it might be worth taking a look to see if it’s happening in your community. ―Jamie Feldman, Lifestyle & Personal Reporter

Try your hand at simple, DIY home renovations.

This week I set out on a mission to paint one wall in my living room. It was certainly a labor of love but doing something with my hands felt really good, and took my mind off of everything for a little while. Plus, it was a killer arm workout (I’m still sore). Now I have a beautiful burnt orange accent wall and knowing I did it myself is something I feel proud of. Even if the top is a teeny tiny bit wonky. ―Feldman

Workout Recommendations

Stretching exercises on Peloton and YouTube.

My workout recommendation is to not work out sometimes. Seriously. The “no excuses” exercise mentality has damaged my relationship with fitness in the past, so I’m trying to be more mindful about acknowledging why I like to workout (the anxiety relief!), what workouts feel good (boxing! weights! short runs!) and when exercise just doesn’t appeal to me. There were a few times recently where my head, heart and body just couldn’t get into exercise. Instead of pushing myself, I listened to myself.

On those days, I opted for a few stretching classes on the Peleton app (which is still offering a free 45-day trial if you sign up before the end of the month!). You can also find stretching and other yoga-related moves on YouTube. Highly recommend taking these types of rest days, stretching your muscles or doing something else that’s more relaxing. You need them. ―Lindsay Holmes, Senior Wellness Editor

Recipe Recommendations

A unique, tasty way to celebrate Taco Tuesday.

I have been trying to stick to some routines for my 5-year-old daughter, who loves to make plans and talk about them all week. So we have been doing Taco Tuesdays, and she gets REALLY into it. This past week, I made this recipe for Pork Tacos with Corn Salsa from a blog called Carlsbad Cravings. I don’t know what about this recipe worked so well, but it was really flavorful and tender, even in salads the next day. I think this will be my go-to taco recipe from now on. I did mess up 1 million dishes in the kitchen making all the steps, but I’ve got loads of time, right?! My daughter’s verdict: “Even though the meat looks disgusting, it’s SO delicious.” Um, thank you? ―Kate Palmer, Head of HuffPost Life

The easiest spaghetti meal with kitchen staples.

Growing up, my parents used to make their own version of Chicken Spaghetti whenever we were short on time or just wanted something easy. It only requires four simple ingredients: Chicken, spaghetti of your choice, peas (which are optional) and zesty Italian dressing. (The zesty version is key!)

Marinate the chicken in the dressing for an hour, then cook it in a pan. Add the peas and a little more dressing once the chicken is cooked and allow it to simmer until the peas are done. While this is going on, make your spaghetti, then mix it all together. I usually just eyeball how much of the dressing you need save a tiny bit of the pasta water and mix that in to make the “sauce” consistent. It’s completely elementary, but it’s delicious, easy and could save you on groceries if you already have these items stocked at home. ―Holmes

A healthier alternative to your favorite fast food meal.

This is embarrassing, but I totally forgot I have an Air Fryer. It was just hiding away in a dark, remote corner, unused and gathering dust. I pulled it out, read the instruction manual, and made the best fried fish I’ve had in ages ― with no oil. Not a drop!

I’ve been having serious fast food cravings lately, so I turned the fish into a healthier version of a Filet-O-Fish sandwich with a brioche bun, homemade tartar sauce, lettuce and American cheese ― and it was FANTASTIC. Now I’m looking forward to figuring out what else I can cook in it. I highly recommend doing the same, whether you have an Air Fryer, an Instant Pot, a waffle maker or whatever. ―Kristen Aiken, Senior Editor, Food & Style

Product Recommendations

A fancy tea blend that makes the ultimate nightcap.

I’ve been aiming to swap my usual nightly glass of cabernet for a cup or two of tea, and I think it’s helped me sleep better and generally feel better the last few weeks. After all, alcohol lowers your immunity, and we could all use all the help we can get now, right? I’ve tried to make it a bit more enticing by using fancy teas and my favorite tea infuser. I’m obsessed with this Cherry Marzipan green tea blend from Tea Forte. I’ll still have that wine, but try to limit it to the weekends. ―Palmer

A postcard you create online and send to your loved ones in the mail.

My family discovered Postable this week, which is a service where you can create and send physical postcards to people. You can choose from a selection of adorable pre-made cards or you can create one using your own photos. The service will then print, stamp, address and mail it. My grandmother is currently in a nursing home without most of her sentimental belongings, so we created our own cards using family photos so she can display them in her room. It’s a nice way to keep in touching during this socially distant time! ―Holmes


Best LCBO Wine Reviews: Vintages Ratings April 17

You can access the 117 wines that I reviewed as a text wine list with my complete tasting notes, scores, food matches.

If you are a Paid Member, you can add my wine picks to your custom shopping list with one click and access that list on your smartphone to find the stock for each wine in your closest LCBO store.

You can also see my wine reviews for April 3.

These are just some of the benefits of supporting out wine community as a Paid Member.

Inventory stock numbers are usually posted online a day or two before the release based on the LCBO doing so.

Curious about what my scores mean or my tasting process?
Find out here.

Here are my reviews that are featured in this issue of LCBO’s Vintages Magazine:


Senate votes down Feinstein’s assault weapons ban

WASHINGTON — In a final appeal to her colleagues to reinstate an assault weapons ban, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) displayed on the Senate floor Wednesday a New York Daily News front page from the day after her ban was pulled from a broader gun control bill: It shows the photos of the 20 first-graders shot to death at Sandy Hook Elementary School with the headline: “Shame on U.S.”

And then, Feinstein told her colleagues, “Show some guts.”

But her attempt to attach the ban to the gun bill failed, drawing just 40 votes, with 60 senators voting against it.

That was fewer than the 52 votes she received in 2004 in her unsuccessful effort to renew the now-lapsed 1994 ban.

Feinstein knew the measure was doomed even before the vote and complained about the “lack of courage” in the chamber.

The vote was a stinging setback for Feinstein, who urged fellow senators to stand with law enforcement officers and victims of gun violence to “take these weapons of war off our streets.”

Feinstein won the backing of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), who had previously voted against renewing the ban. But 15 of her fellow Democrats, including a number from Western states, and one independent voted against the ban, as did all Republicans except Sen. Mark Steven Kirk of Illinois.

“This ban would do little to prevent future gun violence,” said Sen. Mike Johanns (R-Neb.), calling it ironic that “proponents think these weapons are a problem in the hands of law-abiding citizens, but apparently see no problem with these same weapons being glorified in Hollywood movies and video games.”

Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) attacked the measure as a “slippery slope of compromising the 2nd Amendment.”

The controversial measure was doomed when Reid decided last month to leave it out of the broader gun control bill, saying that it would endanger more widely supported measures and was likely to win fewer than 40 votes in the 100-member chamber.

“Not every issue we vote on in the Senate is a life or death matter. I deeply believe this is,” Feinstein told colleagues Wednesday. “The most important duty a government has is to protect its citizens’ safety. When 20 beautiful first-graders are slaughtered, our government has failed that duty.”

She displayed on the Senate floor a photo of a San Francisco police officer shot to death in 2004 by an AK-47 and spoke about the 1993 rampage in a San Francisco office building that left eight people dead and six wounded.

“If only California or New York bans assault weapons, nothing stops an individual from buying an assault weapon in a neighboring state, then crossing the border to commit violence,” Feinstein said.

She predicted that Congress’ failure to act would spur a number of states to pass their own assault weapons bans. “That will result in a confusing patchwork of laws,” she said.

After the vote, Feinstein said she was disappointed, but vowed to continue her fight. “I believe the American people are far ahead of their elected officials on this issue,” she said.


Watch the video: TTF 2020 Black Almanac (June 2022).