Traditional recipes

Ricky Eisen's Tips for Hosting a Garden Party

Ricky Eisen's Tips for Hosting a Garden Party

Ricky Eisen, the celebrated Manhattan event planner and founder of Events & Celebrations by Between the Bread, has hosted many events in her 30-plus years in the business. And now she is spilling her tricks of the trade to The Daily Meal yet again, this time focusing on garden parties. With the weather finally getting warmer and those little buds in the garden blossoming a bit more every day, why not celebrate with a little get-together?

Here are some of Eisen's suggestions for celebrating spring in the fresh outdoors:

Location:

When spring arrives, everyone is eager to be outside and enjoy the warm weather so host the party in a garden, patio area, or around a pool. Don’t have an outdoor area? Bring the outdoors in via décor and be sure to open the windows to let in the fresh air!

Décor and Centerpiece:

Use flowers as centerpieces, at place settings, and throughout the party area to make an event festive. A money-saving alternative is to use silk flowers, which bring the spring theme to life and can be used year after year. For the décor, stick with light colors that complement the outdoor space and the chosen flowers.

Activities:

Plan games or other activities that get guests up and out of their seats. Bocce ball, badminton, and croquet are challenging and fun games that will get everyone mingling.

Menu Choices:

With the warmer weather, choose lighter fare for the menu, and if you have a BBQ take advantage of it. Create a signature drink and leave out all the ingredients, allowing guests to mix their own. Instead of ice cubes that melt and can water down a drink, use frozen fruit.

Parting Gifts:

Let guests bring the spring home by giving everyone a small mason jar with dirt, a packet of seeds, and instructions on how to take care of their new plant.


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


Forward 50, 2010

Until 2000, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz was a leading member of Washington?s policymaking establishment. But something happened: He became an acerbic critic of his former colleagues and even of the premises of modern capitalism ? a position he outlines in his latest book, ?Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy.?

As chairman of President Bill Clinton?s Council of Economic Advisers, Stiglitz worked closely with top policymakers Robert Rubin, Lawrence Summers and Alan Greenspan and assented to the ?Washington Consensus? they crafted: a mix of market deregulation, balanced budgets and anti-inflationary monetary policy the United States prescribed for troubled Third World economies.

In 1997, Stiglitz became senior vice president for development policy at the World Bank. What Stiglitz saw there permanently changed him. In an April 2000 article in The New Republic, Stiglitz predicted that protesters at an upcoming meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank would call the two institutions arrogant, secretive and deaf to input from the countries they are supposed to help. ?They?ll have a point,? he said. During recent economic crises, he stated, ?I saw how the IMF, in tandem with the U.S. Treasury Department, responded. And I was appalled.?

Now 67, Stiglitz is a bitter critic of the bailout of the banks. ?I think many of these guys [should be] in prison,? he said of those responsible for the crash.

In many ways, Stiglitz wears his Judaism quietly. Steeped in Jewish secular ideas and his familial milieu, he?s a public man whose private values are driven by a particular sense of social justice.

Lawrence Summers

During the 1990s, Lawrence Summers was one of the prime architects of President Bill Clinton?s success in eliminating the federal budget deficit. He played a pivotal role in successfully pushing for financial deregulation ? most importantly with his move to defeat proposals that would have regulated derivatives, the complex and often opaque form of leverage that played a key role in crashing the economy under President Bush. But one month into his new job as chief of President Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers, Summers invoked John Maynard Keynes to announce a promised change in outlook. ?When circumstances change, I change my opinion,? he said.

As head of the council, Summers, who served as Harvard University?s first Jewish president from 2001 to 2006, reshaped himself as an advocate of Keynsian deficit spending and reregulation of the financial markets to address the nation?s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Still, some critics say he has been too timid. One of the key players in shaping the administration?s $787 billion economic stimulus package, Summers rejected those who warned it would prove too small. This past spring, with unemployment stuck near 10%, Summers called for a second, $200 billion ?ministimulus,? a proposal given little chance of passage by Congress. The administration?s financial regulatory reforms, passed this year, though sweeping in scope, were also criticized for leaving substantial loopholes, such as exceptions to the requirement that derivatives now be traded publicly. In September, Summers, 55, announced that, come 2011, he would be returning to his tenured position at Harvard.

Two strains dominate Jewish customs throughout the world ? Ashkenazic and Sephardic. But food traditions and recipes are much more localized than religious practices, and it is a rare cookbook or food book that provides an excellent representation of the culinary customs of various Jewish communities. Yet, Gil Marks ? a historian, social worker, ordained rabbi, and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author ? managed to encompass nearly the entirety of Jewish food around the globe in his ?Encyclopedia of Jewish Food,? which came out in September.

The book, which Marks researched and wrote in a remarkably short three years, contains more than 650 entries about Jewish foods and culinary customs from communities as varied as Yemen, Italy, Latvia, China, France and Ethiopia.

Employing his rabbinic knowledge and diverse background, Marks, 58, skillfully traces the history of each food or culinary practice. He supplies the food?s name and its relationship to Jewish texts or holidays, and he situates it in the broader culinary traditions of the surrounding community. The author of four other cookbooks, Marks has also included 300 recipes in his encyclopedia. The first modern Jewish counterpart to ?The Oxford Companion to Food? and France?s ?Larousse Gastronomique,? Marks?s anthology is an indispensable guide to Jewish food.

Shamu Sadeh

It is hard to put a single face on the new Jewish food movement, which has grown immensely in recent years, but one person has certainly planted many seeds of the movement?s success: Shamu Fenyvesi Sadeh, 41, director of Adamah, a farming fellowship for Jews in their 20s, has been instrumental in training and encouraging a new generation of activists who are, in his words, ?cultivating soul and soils, harvesting people and pickles.?

Adamah alumni include such people as Naftali Hanau, who launched Grow and Behold, a pasture-raised kosher chicken company based in Brooklyn, and Risa Alyson Strauss, who opened the Kavanah Organic Community Teaching Garden in Toronto. The 14 participants who work at the farm of the Isabella Friedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut each season learn how to harvest crops, run a dairy and maintain Jewish agricultural traditions.

?We started it before we knew it was the next big thing in terms of sustainability,? Sadeh told the Forward. ?Food issues bring together people, movements, and politics and religion in a way no other environmental or social issues do.?

About his last name: It is not what he was born with, but the name ?Sadeh? existed in his family generations ago. And, of course, it means ?field? in Hebrew ? a fitting reference for someone who is helping to transform the way modern American Jews purchase and prepare ethical, sustainable, Jewish food.

Gail Simmons

America has become obsessed with food television: We?re hooked on cooking shows, eating competitions, cook-offs and culinary travel shows. One of the most recognizable faces of that world is Top Chef judge Gail Simmons. After serving as a judge on several seasons of ?Top Chef? and ?Top Chef Masters? on Bravo TV, Simmons, 34, progressed to hosting and serving as consulting producer on the program?s latest spin-off, ?Top Chef: Just Desserts.?

The dessert and pastry competition among new chefs debuted this September. In her new role, Simmons has put her signature on the show. A special projects manager at Food and Wine magazine ? formerly, she was an events manager for chef Daniel Boulud?s restaurant group as well as an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffrey Steingarten ? Simmons is more than qualified for the part.

While her love of Jewish food is rarely evident on ?Top Chef,? Simmons speaks passionately about her mother?s Jewish cooking. Despite her many projects and successes, Simmons told the Forward, ?the most gratifying thing, is when people come up to me? and tell me that they hate to cook, but they?ve started to try at home and they are trying new things on menus?. That?s why I?m doing all of this in the first place ? to spread the gospel.?


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